About

Start your brilliant career with a degree from Australia's #1 ranked university.

News

Find contact details for any general enquiries.

Events

Find contact details for any general enquiries.

Study with us

Our graduates gain the knowledge and skills to lead organisations, develop public policy, create new companies and undertake research.

Our research

Our research is focused on issues that are highly significant for organisations, the Australian economy, and society at large.

Student resources

Whether you're a new or continuing student, you can find everything you need here about managing your program and the opportunities available to you.

Alumni

Our alumni may be found in the world’s leading companies, policy agencies and universities.

Contact us

Find contact details for any general enquiries.

Staff directory

Professor Michael Martin

Research School of Finance, Actuarial Studies & Statistics

Position: Professor
Email: michael.martin@anu.edu.au
Phone: +61 2 612 54852
Office: Room 4.01, CBE Bld (26C)

Professor Michael Martin

Qualifications

BSc (UQ), PhD (ANU), PFHEA

Biography

Michael Martin is Professor of Statistics in the School of Finance and Applied Statistics at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. He holds a Bachelor of Science (Hons) degree from the University of Queensland (1986) and a PhD in Statistics from the ANU (1989). He held the position of Assistant Professor of Statistics at Stanford University, USA, from 1989 to 1994 and was Annenberg Distinguished Assistant Professor in Statistics at Stanford from 1992 to 1994. In 1994, he accepted a position as Lecturer in Statistics at the ANU, where he became a Senior Lecturer in 1995, Associate Professor in 2003 and Professor in 2007. He has over 75 publications in refereed journals, including papers in Biometrika, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B, Journal of the American Statistical Association and the Journal of Statistics Education. He has published extensively in both theoretical and applied statistics, including applications to medicine (in particular breast cancer), population health and environmental science (air pollution mortality), information systems (factors in business value from the use of information and computer technology), human-computer interfaces, and statistical education. His teaching career includes as highlights the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching, School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University in 1992-3, the Faculty of Economics and Commerce Award for Excellence in Teaching at the ANU in 1998, the ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2000, being named a finalist in the Australian Awards for University Teaching in 2000, a Carrick Citation for Contributions to Teaching and Learning in 2007, and a Carrick Award for Teaching Excellence, also in 2007. He is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI) and has been honoured as a Fellow of the American Statistical Association for his services to research and teaching in statistics. He is also Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK), in 2012, he was selected as an ANU University Education Scholar, and in his current role as Team Lead of the Promoting Excellence team, he is responsible for supervising the office that manages the University’s applications for education excellence awards and grants. He is the co-chair of the Educational Fellowship Scheme Committee at the ANU, the professional recognition scheme for teaching that is accredited by the Higher Education Academy. At the University, he is also the Chair of the ANU Human Research Ethics Committee. In 2017, he was named as an ANU Distinguished Educator.

And, from Michael:

Check out my YouTube lecture on Statistical Graphics - Truth or Dare! You can read the associated article from the ANU reporter here.

And when the OzLotto hit $100 million, WIN news took an interest and came and asked me what numbers to choose. Since every choice has an equally likely chance to come up, your best bet is to choose numbers that others are less likely to choose (so if you win, you'll be less likely to have to share the prize).

Discipline(s)

  • Statistics

Updated:   1 March 2017 / Responsible Officer:  CBE Communications and Outreach / Page Contact:  College Web Team