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Amir Jilani, Bachelor of Commerce / Bachelor of Economics

Amir Jilani

Bachelor of Commerce / Bachelor of Economics

Bachelor of Commerce / Bachelor of Economics '11

Economist at the Centre for International Economics

Why did you choose to study at ANU?

The mix of unparalleled academic opportunities, expert intellectuals and sound educational resources places the ANU amongst the very best universities of the world.

The advantages of studying here are innumerable. They extend from having access to rich intellectual resources including libraries, journals and insightful professors, all the way to a wide range of non-academic activities such as sports, movie nights, societies and clubs which students can immerse in.

The great thing about an average day at ANU is that, it isn’t so average. I personally have felt that there is never a shortage of things in the ‘can-do’ or ‘to-do’ list here at ANU.

Moreover, the ANU empowers students to set their own pace whilst at university. This autonomy is eventually what allows us to grow as students and individuals as we progress through university.

What are your best memories from your time at ANU?

It’s difficult to narrow down the best aspects of my time here at ANU. Having spent 4 years here, I feel that I have been able to extract an array of extremely memorable experiences and opportunities.

I was fortunate to represent the ANU in 2009 at the International Alliance of Research Universities, Global Summer Program (IARU GSP) at the University of California, Berkeley. This was a unique opportunity to use my economics degree in a rather unconventional manner, examining issues of conflict and peace and the relevant impact on economic development.

More recently, I was given the responsibility of a Tutor within the College of Business & Economics. This allowed me to view the university system from a different lens and has inspired in me a new appreciation for teachers, professors and academics.

The combination of such experiences has made my time here at ANU, unquestionably rewarding and thoroughly exciting.

Life after graduation

I graduated from the ANU in 2011 with a dual degree in economics and commerce and a double major in finance and political science. Soon after graduating, I was offered a graduate research assistant position at The Centre for International Economics (CIE), a private economic consultancy.

As a young graduate, I was immediately involved in a wide portfolio of projects including an evaluation of small-scale solar grid-parity and its implications for households and relevant stakeholders, an impact assessment analysing research investment in various regions of Afghanistan and an identification of international opportunities for Victoria.

In my short time at the CIE, I was exposed to some of the key debates circulating in the world of economics including the advent of the carbon tax and the likely impact on industries and consumers.

How has your time at ANU influenced your career?

My time at ANU provided a strong theoretical foundation in economics, together with an appreciation of the complexity that often underpins this field.

Perhaps most importantly, university taught me to think, question and critically analyse issues before arriving at conclusions. I feel this is essential in order to navigate our way through some of the real-world problems in life as well.

Now an Economist at the CIE, I am encouraged to remain inquisitive, recognise uncertainties, question unusual trends and inconsistencies and analyse issues by applying theories to practical applications.

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Updated:   12 April 2017 / Responsible Officer:  Dean, Business & Economics / Page Contact:  College Web Team